World War II Waste Hatch Gunner Remembers

Edward Anthony Maierle Retells his B-24 and B-17 survival maneuvers

Text by Polly Kolstad and Photography by Jesse Martinez

It has been a few years since Edward Anthony Maierle was employed at Fligelman’s Department Store in Helena, Montana.

He was working there December 7, 1941, the day Pearl Harbor was bombed. He immediately enlisted in the U.S. Navy and flew to Hawaii to become an “Avenger” (American torpedo bomber World War II) stationed on Pearl Harbor.

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First Among Centenarians

At the golden age of 102, Geraldine Paulus still has something to give back to life.

Text by Polly Kolstad and Photography by Jesse Martinez

“I don’t know why I’m so special. It’s just that all of my life I’ve been involved with people and traveled a lot,” says Geraldine (Gerry) Paulus, a sprightly silver haired lady, quietly engaging conversation.

Born on a homestead out of Collins, Montana, over 100 years ago, Geraldine (Gerry) Paulus remembers when there was no electricity, no running water, and no telephones.

“I’m from Choteau, born on a homestead out of Collins, 102 plus years ago.”

Paulus lived for a short time in Nebraska. Then, the family came back to Montana when her grandfather passed away and her father took over the farm near Choteau so she and her brother could go to high school. She attended Western Montana College for two years and became a school teacher out of Power.

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A Mission to Fly

Pilots Recollection of the Cold War

Text by Dwayne Nelson and Photography by Jesse Martinez

"As an officer I felt it was my obligation to serve our Country in Vietnam so I requested assignment to a highly classified operation." – retired Air Force Colonel, Lee Mongeon

“As an officer I felt it was my obligation to serve our Country in Vietnam so I requested assignment to a highly classified operation.”
– retired Air Force Colonel, Lee Mongeon

When the atomic bombs ended the war with Japan, WWII was officially over. The subsequent agreements sorting the spoils resulted in two major world

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The Secret Life of Helen Yanuszka

How a Young Female Chemist was Part of the Manhattan Project

Text by Polly Kolstad and Photography by Sara Young

“I try to begin with a quote,” said Helen Yanuszka. “What would I say?”

“Oscar Wilde, ‘the mind is a diary of memories, some fade, not like a writing, that you can tear out of a page.'”

Yanuszka’s thoughts, calculated and collected, have hardly dimmed even into her nineties. She’s a quiet headliner in her own right, though not an open book, until she verbally pages through decades of her life. And then, there is no shortage of source material especially when she recalls the 1940s; that part of her work was so concealed, even she didn’t know what she was doing.

Her “nuggets of the past” are compelling.

She knew the slogan: “Loose lips, sink ships,” which indicated there was no conversing about your employment experience or what you did.

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